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Film

Ridley Scott says he wrote a "f**king good" script for 'Dune'

@Russellisation

Is Ridley Scott a jaded relic of old Hollywood? Quite possibly. After ranting about the influx of superhero films earlier this year, as well as blaming millennials for the lack of success for his sub-par movies, it looks as though the once celebrated director of Blade Runner, Alien and Gladiator may be tarnishing his reputation.

With his latest film, House of Gucci, Scott may have a genuine awards contender, with Dune from Denis Villeneuve being a major opponent for Oscar success. 

Talking about Villeneuve’s science fiction epic, however, Ridley Scott reveals that he too had an idea for an adaptation of Frank Herbert’s iconic novel, an idea that was “fucking good”, as he recalls. Speaking in a brand new interview with Total Film, Scott told the publication that the book has “always been filmable” despite multiple failed attempts from the likes of David Lynch and Alejandro Jodorowsky. 

Continuing, Scott adds: “I had a writer called Rudy Wurlitzer, of the Wurlitzer family…We did a very good take on Dune, because early days, I’d work very, very closely with the writer. I was always glomming the look of the film onto what he or she was writing”. Developing the script following the success of Alien in 1979, Scott had been approached by producer Dino De Laurentiis to take on Frank Herbert’s science fiction goliath. 

“We did a script, and the script is pretty fucking good,’” Scott reported, before dropping out of the project after the insistence of De Laurentiis that the film should be shot in Mexico to keep costs down. Reacting with surprise, Ridley Scott said: “‘Really?’ So he sent me to Mexico City. And with the greatest respect to Mexico City, in those days [it was] pretty pongy. I didn’t love it”. 

Finding the working conditions too poor to cope with, Scott backed out of the project, allowing Eraserhead director, David Lynch to fill his boots on the doomed project.

You can take a look at the trailer for Lynch’s self-confessed “failure”, below.