(Credit: Shapol)

Diddy and Nas help induct The Notorious B.I.G. into Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Diddy and Nas paid tribute to The Notorious B.I.G. as the fallen giant of hip-hop was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame. 

Biggy was posthumously inducted through the virtual ceremony alongside the likes of Whitney Houston, T. Rex, Nine Inch Nails, Depeche Mode and The Doobie Brothers. It was announced earlier this year that the 2020 ceremony, which was originally set to take place in May, had been moved November and take place in virtual form in the wake of the ongoing health crisis. Although the ceremony was different this year, the moment that Diddy and Nas inducted The Notorious B.I.G. into the illustrious class was an emotional moment despite the virtual nature of the show.

Diddy, who famously signed Biggy to his label Bad Boy Records in 1993, said: “Big just wanted to be biggest, he wanted to be the best, he wanted to have influence and impact people in a positive way, and that clearly has been done all over the world.”

He added: “Nobody has come close to the way Biggie sounds, to the way he raps, to the frequency that he hits. Tonight we are inducting the greatest rapper of all time into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Notorious B.I.G. representing Brooklyn, New York, we up in here.”

Nas then powerfully said, “Rap music is all about who’s gonna be the king. The West Coast, they was selling millions of records, and before Big, I felt like there was only so far New York rap could go as far as sales. Biggie changed all of that.”

Biggy’s children Tyanna and CJ Wallace then accepted the honour on his behalf with emotional speeches about their father. “When my dad passed away I was only three years old,” said Tyanna. “Even though I didn’t get to know him as well as I wanted, through his fans and our family I was able to see with my own eyes that his music transcended the hip-hop industry. He was able to not just become the king of New York but the king of the culture.”

CJ then added, “Our father was one of the founding fathers of hip-hop. He helped revolutionise what was a young art form for the Black community and the world. I’m honoured to share his name and his dedication to Black music, creativity, self-expression, and Black freedom. I love you, Meemaw. Thanks for teaching us who Christopher Wallace was as a son, friend, poet, artist, and father. We love you Meemaw. We love you, dad. Brooklyn, we did it!”

Check out their acceptance speech, below.

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