(Credit: Sorry / Domino)

Sorry share two new singles

Sorry have shared two brand new singles, ‘Cigarette Packet’ and ‘Separate’.

The new releases are the first pieces of music from the spellbinding London group since they dropped their acclaimed debut effort, 925, in 2020. The pair of tracks mark a welcomed return for the group who have arrived like London buses, which leave you waiting in the rain and then all of a sudden, two arrive at once. Not that we are complaining, the more Sorry singles, the merrier as far as we are concerned.

The pair of tracks are as wildly expansive and genre-defying as we’ve come to expect from Sorry. ‘Separate’ is more dejected than the up-beat ‘Cigarette Packet’, which transports you to a smoking area at midnight after one to many, and the dizzy beat leaves you feeling inebriated.

Both tracks have also arrived with videos, with ‘Cigarette Packet’ picturing smokers blissfully puffing away. While the video for ‘Separate’ takes the viewer on a POV bike ride, which bizarrely has cutaways of toy cars relaxing in a bath.

“The sounds are quite metallic / silver / grey and the lyrical ideas are repetitive almost as if they are whispers / mantras/ worries that you’d say to yourself and keep to yourself,” singer Asha Lorenz said of the tracks.

“We try and make the videos in a playful way whilst also expressing lots of mood and emotion; the use of black space and never showing full faces or using objects (like the toy cars) makes it feel like they’re flashes of thought or surreal memories,” Lorenz said of the tracks and their accompanying visuals.

“We loosely based ‘Separate’ on the J. G. Ballard novel Crash. It’s as if the water is his mind and he’s relaying or planning the series of crashes with the toy cars. Most of all, the videos are used for the colour splash or the movement to give the song almost another layer of rhythm that’s maybe audibly invisible but you visually can feel it within the song.

“With ‘Cigarette Packet’, we wanted it to feel claustrophobic and for intensity to build where it felt right. The mouths all merge into one voice, by the end it’s hard to tell who’s saying what, as if all your friends or people you meet are just parts of you. It’s weird what your mind chooses to hear or remember.”

Check out the videos below.