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(Credit: Paul Rider)

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My Bloody Valentine are working on two new albums

@josephtaysom

Following their long-awaited arrival onto streaming services yesterday, and the news that they had signed with Domino Records, it’s now been revealed that My Bloody Valentine are working on two new albums.

It’s an excellent time to be a fan of the shoegaze icons right now, with the group set to release brand new physical editions on May 21st through the label alongside a major re-release project. On top of the standard physical editions, 1988’s Isn’t Anything and 1991 effort Loveless are being mastered fully from analogue for the first time; both of these records will be released as deluxe LPs. The vinyl will be mastered from new hi-res uncompressed digital sources for standard LPs.

During a brand new interview with the New York Times, Kevin Shields spoke about the two new records that lay on the horizon and described them vaguely. The first album would be “warm and melodic”, while the second would be more experimental.

“I’m not describing it properly on purpose,” Shields said. “I don’t want to give too much away because I could lay it out verbally, and then someone’s going to go, ‘That’s a really good idea’.” 

Bilinda Butcher commented that, realistically, they should record the albums by the end of the year. However, it’s all reliant on the pandemic, with Shields needing to go over to Ireland to lay down the vocals, which he says is usually the last thing on the record.

“I don’t want to be 70-something wanting to make the next record after [2013’s] mbv. I think it’d be cooler to make one now,” Shields explained about his desire to get back in the studio.

“Our original plan was we would record both the albums back-to-back and then go tour on that,” the singer also said. “And that would have been this year, you know, but everything really did slow down.”

Speaking on the decision to sign with Domino, Shields said: “We definitely wanted to work with an independent label, opposed to a major. Domino was the ultimate kind of independent setup — they have as many facilities as most majors, but they’re owned by one person.

“Our original plan was we would record both the albums back-to-back and then go tour on that,” he said. “And that would have been this year, you know, but everything really did slow down.

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