The 1975’s Matty Healy returns to stage in a hospital gown after serious illness
(Credit: Markus Hillgärtner)

Matty Healy announces new conversational podcast series featuring Brian Eno, Stevie Nicks, Kim Gordon and more

Matty Healy, the frontman of popular indie band The 1975, has launched a brand new conversational podcast.

The new series, which comes in collaboration with The Face magazine, will see Healy sit down in discussion with “some of my friends and heroes” and cover a wide range of different topics.

The interview series will host Brian Eno as part of the first episode and, from there, will see Healy welcome Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon, Steve Reich, Mike Kinsella, Bobby Gillespie, Conor Oberst and Stevie Nicks.

You can hear a section of Healy’s conversation with Eno, below.

In other The 1975-related news, Healy has been talking about the writing process the band’s forthcoming new album, Notes On A Conditional Form, which he has likened his creative method approaching lyricism to the craft of stand-up comedy.

Notes on a Conditional Form arrives as the eagerly-anticipated follow-up to 2018 effort A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships and, as The 1975 ramp up the excitement, they have now released a total of seven tracks taken from the 22 track record. It is set to include the singles ‘People’, ‘Me and You Together Song’, ‘Jesus Christ 2005 God Bless America’ and ‘If You’re Too Shy (Let Me Know)’.

Speaking to Music Week, Healy offered an insight into his creative process on the record saying he “left no stone unturned in how I try and delineate who I am, to make sure I haven’t left out any of the shitty bits.”

He added: “Sometimes, if you find comfort in expressing yourself in a long-form way then it can be a challenge to express yourself in a short-form way. But I think I’m quite good at both now.”

Healy then compared his lyric-writing process to how comedians approach the art of stand-up comedy, saying: “The best comedians are the ones who express their biggest ideas in the fewest words, that’s something I strive to do.”

“If the album isn’t funny, it’s deeply earnest or about my deepest fears and anxieties,” he said, adding that he thought that ‘Playing On My Mind’ and ‘Roadkill’ were “probably my funniest songs”.

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