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Jonah Hill explains why Martin Scorsese is the ultimate genius

Martin Scorsese is regarded by many as the greatest living director in the world right now. Even James Gunn acknowledges this fact despite the feud between the two filmmakers about the distinction between Marvel films and cinema that Scorsese made. A pioneer of New Hollywood Cinema, Scorsese has maintained his artistic momentum with films like The Irishman.

Scorsese’s latest project will be an adaptation of David Grann’s book and will focus on the ‘Reign of Terror’ which plagued the Osage Nation during the 1920s. Titled The Killers of the Flower Moon, the film already boasts of a star-studded cast that includes the likes of Robert De Niro, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brendan Fraser and Jesse Plemons, among others.

In an interview with Howard Stern, American actor and filmmaker Jonah Hill commented on just how impressive Scorsese’s cinematic genius was. The actor has collaborated with the filmmaker on the wildly successful 2013 biographical drama The Wolf of Wall Street, which was lauded by critics and fans alike.

The film depicted the life of Jordan Belfort (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) who rises through the ranks of Wall Street with style, money and countless charges of fraud. Hill starred as Donnie Azoff, a crazy minion who follows Belfort blindly into the uncharted territory of Wall Street scams and ungodly amounts of profit. For his brilliant performance, Hill received an Oscar bid for Best Supporting Actor.

Hill attempted to explain Scorsese’s genius through a chess analogy: “You like chess, right? Imagine if you can make the most complex chess move with no clock. You have four hours to make your move, you’re still a brilliant chess player. Now imagine that you make an even better chess move than that brilliant chess player but you do it in 30 seconds with the clock going.”

Adding: “What it takes a brilliant director, who is not yet at that place possibly… I’m talking [about] someone who is a master chess player, a master director. He can fix that problem, it’s advanced problem solving, in 30 seconds. You literally watch him close his eyes and solve an insanely complex issue… directing is just solving issues constantly.”

When he made his own film called Mid90s, Hill definitely used the lessons he learnt while working with a filmmaker of Martin Scorsese’s stature. Described as “promising” by many critics, Mid90s was the perfect example of Hill’s sensitive and nuanced artistic vision.

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