Subscribe to our newsletter

(Credit: Alamy)

Film

Cillian Murphy opens up about new Christopher Nolan film ‘Oppenheimer’

Christopher Nolan has been attracting a lot of attention while starting up the production process of his latest project, moving on from the relatively lacklustre display of Tenet. Nolan is attempting to construct yet another massive cinematic spectacle that has defined his journey as a filmmaker since the very beginning of his career.

Titled Oppenheimer, the film will revolve around the life and times of the titular J. Robert Oppenheimer, who is often credited as the “father of the atomic bomb”. The role is being played by none other than Cillian Murphy, the star of Peaky Blinders who claimed that there were a lot of similarities between the two roles even though they belonged to different worlds.

“I’m interested in the man, and what [inventing the atomic bomb] does to the individual,” Murphy said in an interview while talking about his approach. “The mechanics of it, that’s not really for me – I don’t have the intellectual capability to understand them, but these contradictory characters are fascinating.”

“Tommy Shelby’s a complete contradiction, too,” Murphy added. According to the actor, there was a strand of similarity between the two, which he picked up on, and it helped him to expand on his vision for Oppenheimer. “People identify with that, because we all walk around with these contradictory ideas coexisting in our heads.”

Murphy and Nolan have collaborated on previous occasions, ranging from The Dark Knight Trilogy to Inception and Dunkirk. That’s exactly why Nolan did not hesitate to cast him in the major role for his new film, and Murphy agreed too because he considers Nolan to be among the finest directors in the current landscape.

“I think he’s flying the flag,” the actor declared. “Him, Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino, are fantastic filmmakers making interesting work on a massive scale.” According to Murphy, these key figures are making fascinating works from within the studio system, which is keeping the cinema experience alive.