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(Credit: Sebastian Mlynarski & Kevin J Thomson)

Chvrches share powerful new single 'Good Girls'

Chvrches - 'Good Girls'
8.5

Chvrches have teased their fourth album, Screen Violence, with their powerful new single ‘Good Girls’.

The emphatic track sees singer Lauren Mayberry lash out at the challenges that women face on a daily basis, which are deeply entrenched within society. ‘Good Girls’ captures Mayberry in a defiant mood and refusing to accept that this is the way that life should be for 50% of the population.

Sonically speaking, Chvrches stick with their trademark synth-pop tones that they’ve helped popularise in recent years. There’s an army of bands who have attempted to follow in the Scottish group’s footprints by incorporating synths, and it’s become the norm within indie music. Yet, Chvrches’ knack for creating delectable moments of ecstasy puts them in their own league.

‘Good Girls’ sees Mayberry pour a tonne of emotion into her vocals as she opens her heart to plead: “Is it easier when you don’t have to count to ten? When you don’t have to pretend? I want to know that feeling, Is it easier when you don’t have to start again, When you don’t want to make amends? I want to know that feeling.”

Commenting on the lyrical theme of inequality and prejudice, Mayberry said: “The opening line (killing your idols is a chore) was something I wrote after listening to some friends arguing about the present day implications of loving certain problematic male artists – I was struck by the lengths that people would go to in order to excuse their heroes and how that was so juxtaposed to my own experiences in the world.

“Women have to constantly justify their right to exist and negotiate for their own space. We’re told that Bad Things don’t happen to Good Girls. That if you curate yourself to fit the ideal – keep yourself small and safe and acceptable – you will be alright, and it’s just not fucking true.”

The thunderous new single is not only a magnetic effort from Chvrches, but it’s about a vital subject that needs addressing. Music can be a forceful tool for bringing about societal change, and in the wake of PC Wayne Couzens pleading guilty to the murder of Sarah Everard — ‘Good Girls’ sadly feels even more appropriate.

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