Spike Lee’s new upcoming film BlacKkKlansman will feature a previously unheard song by Prince on its soundtrack.

The film, which is about an African-American cop who goes undercover in the KKK, focuses on focuses on Ron Stallworth – played by John David Washington – who worked as a police officer in the early ’70s.

The fact-based race drama, produced by Jordan Peele and the team behind his hit 2017 film Get Out, also stars Adam Driver playing the role of Stallworth’s colleague Flip Zimmerman along with stars Laura Harrier and Topher Grace.

Now, to add to what is already growing acclaim for Lee, it has been confirmed that the film has secured the addition of a previously unreleased Prince track ‘Mary Don’t You Weep’. The song will play during the film’s end credits.

“I knew that I needed an end-credits song,” the director told Rolling Stone. “I’ve become very close with Troy Carter, one of the executives at Spotify [and a Prince estate advisor].

“So I invited Troy to a private screening. And after, he said, ‘Spike, I got the song.’ And that was ‘Mary Don’t You Weep,’ which had been recorded on cassette in the mid-80s.”

He added: “Prince wanted me to have that song, I don’t care what nobody says. My brother Prince wanted me to have that song. For this film.

“There’s no other explanation to me. This cassette is in the back of the vaults. In Paisley Park. And all of a sudden, out of nowhere, it’s discovered? Nah-ah. That ain’t an accident.”

Recently, Lee said of the film: “Ron Stallworth is reading the paper, the Colorado Springs Gazette, and the Klan put an ad in the paper that they needed new members,” explaining at a recent Tribeca film festival panel.

“Ron Stallworth thinks that it’s a goof so he calls up and, thinking it’s a joke, leaves his real name and phone number on a voicemail – and the Klan calls back. They say, ‘We want you to come down.’ Since he’s an African American, he can’t really show up for the interview. He has to get a white police officer to play him, and that’s Adam Driver.”

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