Credit: Sophie

Scottish producer Sophie has tragically died aged 34

The Grammy-nominate producer known as Sophie has tragically died aged 34. The acclaimed Scottish musician was known for always pushing the envelope of pop music and her legacy will live on.

Speaking to the Guardian, Sophie’s management informed the publication that the producer had died in the early hours of the morning “following a sudden accident. At this time respect and privacy for the family is our priority. We would also ask for respect for her fanbase, and to treat the private nature of this news with sensitivity.”

The statement went on to say that Sophie was “a pioneer of a new sound, one of the most influential artists in the last decade. Not only for ingenious production and creativity but also for the message and visibility that was achieved. An icon of liberation.”

Sophie’s UK label Transgressive Records also provided a statement of shock and sadness: “True to her spirituality she had climbed up to watch the full moon and accidentally slipped and fell. She will always be here with us.”

‘Nothing More To Say’ was Sophie’s debut single and saw the Galsweigian star gain a foothold in the industry before her debut record Product truly cemented the producer’s place as an innovative musician.

Sophie also go-wrote Madonna’s 2015 track ‘Bitch, I’m Madonna’ and has worked alongside rapper Vince Staples, Let’s Eat Grandma as well as Kim Petra and pop queen Charli XCX.

As well as being a progressive producer, Sophie also provided a role model from transgender kids. Speaking with Paper magazine about the idea of gender identity, Sophie said: “Transness is taking control to bring your body more in line with your soul and spirit so the two aren’t fighting against each other and struggling to survive … It means you’re not a mother or a father – you’re an individual who’s looking at the world and feeling the world.”

Christine and the Queens paid tribute to the producer saying Sophie was “a stellar producer, a visionary, a reference. She rebelled against the narrow, normative society by being an absolute triumph, both as an artist and as a woman. I can’t believe she is gone. We need to honour and respect her memory and legacy. Cherish the pioneers.”