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(Credit: Man Alive)

Music

Robert Plant opens up about "unpleasant" lawsuit around 'Stairway To Heaven’

@SamWKemp

Opening up in a recent interview, Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant has admitted that the legal battle fought over the stadium rock group’s classic track ‘Stairway To Heaven’ was “unpleasant” and “unfortunate”.

The lawsuit against Led Zeppelin was first filed by Michael Skidmore, a trustee for the estate of Spirit guitarist Randy California, in 2014. In it, he maintained that the 1971 song ‘Stairway To Heaven’ violated the copyright of Spirit’s 1968 track ‘Taurus’.

Led Zeppelin have since won three attempts over the case, with the most recent intended to place in October 2020, but which the US supreme court refused to hear, upholding a ruling made in march that signalled the final opportunity for legal appeal in its current form.

Now, Plant has opened up about the case on a BBC Radio 4 interview with Clive Anderson, during which plant was asked about the lengthy copyright battle: “What can you do? I just had to sit there,” he recalled. “I was instructed to sit directly opposite the jury, don’t look at them but just don’t look at anybody, just sit there for eight hours.”

“As much as I am musical, I cannot comment on anything musical, I just sing,” he added. “There are zillions and zillions of songs that were carrying the same chord progression, so it was very unfortunate, and it was unpleasant for everybody.”

Elsewhere, Led Zeppelin made the decision to join TikTok last month, with the band’s full discography being made available to users, who will be able to pull songs to soundtrack their posts. The new account is set to release Led Zeppelin-themed artwork, graphics, and rare performance footage.

The band’s official account will see them join the likes of The Beatles and ABBA – both of whom signed up to TikTok in 2021. The Beatles made 36 of their biggest songs available to users, including ‘Hey Jude’, ‘Love Me Do,’ ‘Something, ‘Eleanor Rigby’, ‘Day Tripper’ and ‘Paperback Writer.’