Photographer Rhiannon Adams captures some spirited Polaroids of the beach in these spectacular photos. Honing her skills for over ten years, Adams manages to capture light in all its eccentricities. Preferring to use only available light when shooting her work appears to catalogue daily life in a mystifying manner. Such is the skill when working Polaroids, no editing or cropping takes place, forcing the artist to live in the moment with just one chance to get the perfect shot.

When discussing why she prefers the Polaroid Adams said, “because it is a medium with a whole set of individual rules particular to instant photography that allow an honesty and mysticism one can only dream of with digital,” in an interview with Polaroid.

The main topic of Adams’ project focusses on the beach and, when discussing her reasoning and inspiration for this, she states how “somehow ‘Britishness’ relates to being an Island nation, having an indefatigable spirit, and being determined to make the best of what we have. There is nothing more British than standing on a beach in gale force winds with your toes buried in cold clammy sand having a ‘good time’. Or sitting in a parked car with a thermos, the windscreen wipers brushing away the tears of another summer downpour.”

The artist goes on to discuss further how “Margate is a place that most of us have heard of. It is the poster child British seaside town, its name synonymous with childhood memories of swimming in water that’s just a bit too cold, of buckets and spades, ice cream, deckchairs and donkeys. Its history riddled with familiar pairs: mods and rockers, Chas and Dave, Del Boy and Rodney, highs and lows, boom and bust. We all have our own Margate – you can find one on every British coast.”

Here, explore some of her images course of Its Nice That and Flavor Wire:

(All images sourced via Its Nice That and Flavor Wire. To find more of Rhiannon’s work, visit her website, here.)

Comments

No more articles