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Nick Cave has great advice for growing old: "Grow a porn star moustache"

We’re always happy to take advice from Nick Cave. The Bad Seeds singer has become a rock agony uncle of sorts over recent years as he continues to use his Red Hand Files platform to answer fan questions.

These questions have ranged from the brilliant to the bleak and seen Cave open up to his audience as no artist has ever really done before. But, as well as offering a shoulder to cry on or a bag to punch, Cave has also dished out some humourous advice. His latest tips for growing old are solid gold.

The answer came in response to Remok from Belgium’s question, “I’m struggling a bit with the fact I’m turning 40 in a week. Some people say ‘You’re in the brightest part of your life’, others say you are an ‘old man’. What is your perspective on getting old?”

If questions were ‘made’ for answering, then this one had Cave’s name all over it. He rolled his shoulders and swung for the stars: “My advice to you is to grow a porn star moustache and learn the electric guitar — it worked for me — and try to hang in there until you’re 60. Then you’ll find you don’t have to worry about what people say anymore and, as a consequence, life becomes a whole lot more interesting.”

Cave has always approached the idea of growing old with a degree of disgracefulness that confirms he’s living his best life. At age 63, he shows no sign of slowing his creative process down and reflected with Remko about how it feels to be reaching these milestones: “Entering your 60s brings with it a warm and fuzzy feeling of freedom through redundancy, through obsolescence, through living outside of the conversation and forever existing on the wrong end of the stick,” he said.

“What a relief it is to be that mad, embarrassing uncle in the corner of the room, a product of his age, with his loopy ideas about free speech and freedom of expression, with his love of beauty, of humour, chaos, provocation and outrage, of conversation and debate, his adoration of art without dogma, his impatience with the morally obvious, his belief in universal compassion, forgiveness and mercy, in nuance and the shadows, in neutrality and in humanity — ah, beautiful humanity — and in God too, who he thanks for letting him, in these dementing times, be old.”

It’s another reason to love Nick Cave and another reason to always check out the latest edition of his Red Hand Files.

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