New Zealand has been forced to change the classification of Bradley Cooper’s remake of A Star Is Born.

David Shanks, of the countries classification board, demanded that a warning is added to the film after Police Victim Support responded to two vulnerable young people who had been “severely triggered” by the movie after a scene depicts Cooper’s character hanging himself.

According to reports, the Office of Film and Literature Classification has confirmed that they received further complaints about the film which had been reported by the Mental Health Foundation.

The film, which has been M (Unrestricted, suitable for 16 years and over) in Australia, automatically continued the same M rating in New Zealand by the Film and Video Labelling Body, adding the note of “Sex scenes, offensive language and drug use.” However, the classification failed to mention a mental health warning, a situation which forced Shanks to add the note “and suicide” to the statement.

“The first complaint involved Police Victim Support advising that they responded to two vulnerable young people who had been severely triggered by the scene,” Shanks said.

“Many people in New Zealand have been impacted by suicide. For those who have lost someone close to them, a warning gives them a chance to make an informed choice about watching.”


For anybody who might be struggling to deal with mental health issues, here are some helpline numbers for you to talk to: 

Mind

Promotes the views and needs of people with mental health problems.

Phone: 0300 123 3393 (Mon-Fri, 9am-6pm)

Website: www.mind.org.uk

Anxiety UK

Charity providing support if you’ve been diagnosed with an anxiety condition.

Phone: 03444 775 774 (Mon-Fri, 9.30am-5.30pm)

Website: www.anxietyuk.org.uk

No Panic

Voluntary charity offering support for sufferers of panic attacks and OCD. Offers a course to help overcome your phobia/OCD. Includes a helpline.

Phone: 0844 967 4848 (daily, 10am-10pm)

Website: www.nopanic.org.uk

Rethink Mental Illness

Support and advice for people living with mental illness.

Phone: 0300 5000 927 (Mon-Fri, 9.30am-4pm)

Website: www.rethink.org

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