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Film

London scientists name a tree after Leonardo DiCaprio

Scientists based at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew have named a new tree after Leonardo DiCaprio. The tree has been named Uvariopsis DiCaprio and is situated in the Cameroonian forest. Scientists decided to name it after the actor on account of his extensive work helping to combat deforestation. 

Dr Martin Cheek of Kew told BBC“We think he was crucial in helping to stop the logging of the Ebo Forest.” The Uvariopsis DiCaprio is a tropical evergreen that has glossy yellow flowers and is only found in one small part of the forest. 

DiCaprio has been a vocal supporter of local protestors trying to prevent the destruction of the Ebo Forest, which is also home to many endangered species of animals. Uvariopsis DiCaprio is the first new plant to be officially named by Kew’s scientists this year. 

In other news, Kate Winslet, who starred alongside DiCaprio in 1997’s blockbuster Titanic, has said she “couldn’t stop crying” when she recently reunited with DiCaprio after three years without seeing each other. 

Discussing their reunion in The Guardian, Winslet explained: “I couldn’t stop crying. I’ve known him for half my life! It’s not as if I’ve found myself in New York or he’s been in London and there’s been a chance to have dinner or grab a coffee and catch up.”

It is fitting that DiCaprio has had his environmental efforts recognised by science. He stars in the new Netflix satire Don’t Look Up, a satire based on the impending climate disaster that humanity faces. Featuring an all-star cast including Jennifer Lawrence and Meryl Streep it’s a cautionary tale that everyone could do with watching.

Reviewing the filmFar Out‘s Monica Reid said: “Writer and director Adam McKay (Vice, The Big Short) has produced a half-serious, half-mocking disaster film that uses the threat of planetary destruction as a device to effectively satirise… almost everything. American politics, news media, internet trends, corporate influence on public policy, and above all the modern tendency to trivialise even the most serious subjects, are all held up to nonstop ridicule.”

Watch the trailer for Don’t Look Up below.