Lily Allen opens up about her sex addiction, mental health and more

Lily Allen opens up about her sex addiction, mental health and more

Lily Allen has been talking about her problems with addiction and mental health struggles in a wonderfully honest new interview.

Allen, whose recent work has seen her pen some of her most sincere lyrics to date, has found a level of happiness after years of struggles with sex addiction, sexism within the music industry, and battles with her own mental health.

“I’m surprised I’m not dead,” she begins while speaking to The Guardian. “The music industry was a hedonistic place in the noughties. It was all about having fun and getting fucked up. People who indulge don’t generally come out the other side. Having children triggered responsibilities,” she added.

Allen then details the time she spent in a psychiatric ward after being section following fears of self-harm but explains how the experience resulted in her coming “out of it slightly healthier than when I went it” in a moment of reflection.

The top moved on to substance abuse, to which the pop start explained: “Sex can still be an addiction,” before adding: “I chose sex over heroin. I didn’t realise at the time. Addiction can manifest itself in all manners of ways. You use substances or sex to put a plaster over something else, like pain or fear. There are all manner of destructive things you can get up to.”

The article confirms what all Lily Allen fans have grown to understand in recent months; her maturity and level headed approach to dealing with some demons that she has battled with in the past has resulted in a much-needed sense of balance.

It wasn’t too long ago that people on the internet were sharing “up skirt” images of her on stage without underwear, a move she noticed instantly as an attempt to “shame” her. “I’m not embarrassed about having a vagina,” Allen says defiantly. “That’s why I retweeted those knickerless pictures of me on stage. They were taken with the sole purpose of trying to embarrass and shame me and I didn’t like it. So I took ownership of them.”

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