(Credit: Kero Kero Bonito)

Kero Kero Bonito release new EP 'Civilisation II'

Kero Kero Bonito, the English indie pop group, have announced the release of a brand new EP Civilisation II.

“Each of Civilisation II’s three tracks are set in the past, present and future respectively,” the band explain in a press release “‘The Princess and the Clock’ (past) is a legend of our own invention, designed to feel like a familiar folk tale. It tells the story of a young explorer who was kidnapped and revered as a princess by an isolated society; her worshippers later found her gone, but it’s up to the listener to guess her fate. ‘21/04/20’ embodies our present, and ‘Well Rested’ (future) is our longest track yet at over seven minutes.”

Adding: “‘Well Rested’ addresses The Resurrection and humanity’s distant future. It’s a humanist manifesto for the Anthropocene in several parts incorporating chants, a constant four-to-the-floor and field recordings of natural sites. The Civilisation era, with its conflation of time on the grandest scale, is a bridge between our more personal 2018 album Time ‘n’ Place and KKB’s next move. Whatever that may be, don’t forget: You Cannot Stop Civilisation.”

If anything, Kero Kero Bonito are a band that never stops changing. Initially, KKB were a big, bright and shiny pop group that played synthetic J-pop adjacent dance music, which you can hear on 2014’s Intro Bonito and 2016’s Bonito Generation. I’m sure I am in the minority here, but the early Kero Kero Bonito always felt a little strange to me: a little too sonically close to the strange fetishisation of Japanese culture that occurs online, a little too much like it’s music made for neckbeard naval gazers who want a waifu more than anything in the world.

So imagine my delight and surprise when 2018’s Time ‘n’ Place prioritised grungy fuzz rock over the polished pop sound of the band’s past. KKB are still an acquired taste for me, but now I listen with interest rather than trepidation.

Check out the Civilisations EP down, below.