Subscribe to our newsletter

(Credit: Jagged Edge Productions)

Film

First look at 'Winnie The Pooh: Blood and Honey' hints at a startling reimagination

A collection of images have been unveiled from Winnie The Pooh: Blood And Honey, which aims to reimagine the legend by way of a horror tale. Winnie The Pooh: Blood And Honey will be directed by Rhys Frake-Waterfield, and will feature Amber Doig-Thorne, Maria Taylor, Danielle Scott, Danielle Ronald and Chris Cordell among the castings. Craig David Dowsett will play the titular bear. Plot details are flimsy, but it’s rumoured to take the form of a slasher movie.

The characters were created by A.A. Milne and illustrator E.H. Shepard in 1926, although they went into the public domain at the beginning of 2022, which permits anyone to use the character in creative media free from copyright laws. The film will be vastly different to the Disney properties in recent times and might alienate fans looking for a more traditional view of the character.

Winnie The Pooh was recently given the live screen treatment when the character emerged to comfort Christopher Robin in the film of the same name. Christopher Robin starred Ewan McGregor, who said he was “was very charmed by the script and the fact that they take Christopher Robin as a man [of his] age and that Winnie the Pooh comes back to him in a difficult time in his life.”

Author A.A. Milne based the character Christopher Robin on his son Christopher Robin Milne and based the animals on the toys that decorated his son’s life. Christopher Robin named his toy bear after a Canadian black bear that could be spotted at the London zoo.

In 1961, Walt Disney Productions licensed certain rights from the Milne estate, in the hope of translating the character into a new form of entertainment. Their depiction of a bear dressed in a red shirt likely stems from Stephen Slesinger’s portrait of the character.

Irish actor Domhnall Gleeson portrayed A.A. Milne in a stylised retelling of the author’s life: Goodbye Christopher Robin. Milne died in the 1950s, at the tender age of 74. On the subject of mortality, the author had this to say about his life, his work, and his malleable characters: “I suppose that every one of us hopes secretly for immortality; to leave, I mean, a name behind him which will live forever in this world, whatever he may be doing, himself, in the next.”

(Credit: Jagged Edge Productions)
(Credit: Jagged Edge Productions)
(Credit: Jagged Edge Productions)
(Credit: Jagged Edge Productions)