Chris Cornell’s daughter launches mental health awareness podcast in memory of her father
Credit: Andreas Eldh

A heartbreaking look back at footage of Chris Cornell singing ‘Hunger Strike’ to his children from 2007

Chris Cornell, born on this day in 1964, is eternally missed in the music world since his tragically premature death in 2017. The enigmatic singer was a truly one of a kind artist who broke down barriers with Soundgarden, Temple of the Dog and Audioslave as well as an esteemed solo career.

This heartwrenching footage of Cornell performing Temple of the Dog’s 1991 single ‘Hunger Strike’ to his young children—who had joined him on stage during a performance—shows what a family man he was and that they were truly his world.

With his children by his side, Cornell was in his absolute element doing the thing that he loved with the people who he most cherished, a moment which is the most glorious thing you’ll see today and a perfect way to remember both Cornell’s two faceted personalities as both a rock god and the family-orientated person he became when he stepped off-stage.

‘Hunger Strike’ is one of his most personal songs, a track which came from a place of heartache and is a poignant number which is brought even more to the forefront when Cornell is delivering the track from his heart to his beloved children.

Temple of the Dog is a project surrounded in grief, one which began when Chris Cornell wrote two songs in honour of his close friend Andrew Wood who died of a heroin overdose in March 1990. Wood was kept on life support for three days after he overdosed, during which time Cornell visited him. Wood was in a promising Seattle band called Mother Love Bone with Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament, who were forming their new band that would become Pearl Jam and took part in Temple of the Dog.

‘Hunger Strike’ would be the last song that was recorded for the album and was written because Chris Cornell penned the track because the group only had only nine songs and he has a compulsive distaste for odd numbers. Describing the song in the Pearl Jam Twenty collection, he said, “I was wanting to express the gratitude for my life but also disdain for people where that’s not enough, where they want more. There’s no way to really have a whole lot more than you need usually without taking from somebody else that can’t really afford to give it to you. It’s sort of about taking advantage of a person or people who really don’t have anything.”

Watch the rare footage below which shows Cornell and his children creating a memory that will undoubtedly stay with them forever.

Subscribe to our newsletter
Delivering curated content