(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)

Border Crossing House – Italy

Border Crossing House—or Casa di ConFine as it is known in Italian—is a structure built by Simone Subissati Architects as an avant-garde barn-styled build that attempts to bridge the gap between the city and the countryside

Perched on a ridge of hills located close to Polverigi, a province of Ancona in the Italian region Marche, the home encompasses its space within the fields, merging the freedom of its surroundings and the traditions of the region’s farmhouse architecture.

Polverigi, a location that borders the municipalities such as Agugliano, Ancona, Jesi, Offagna, Osimo and Santa Maria Nuova, is situated close to the Adriatic Sea and remains closely affiliated with some of the most treasured Italian traditions offering a glimpse into its rich cultural history.

The design, wanting to remain true to the land while approaching a more contemporary dynamic, allows visitors to gain a sense of the outside when travelling from one space to another and, with the included swimming pool mirroring the house on its surface, finishes the slick design which further attention to detail of the architect. The lower level is clad with varnished sheets of iron, treated with anti-rust primer while its top level has a lighter approach by mixing glass with the white walls.

(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)

Speaking about the design architect, Simone Subissati mentioned: “For the border crossing house I imagined a space that would feel as if it was ‘inherited.’ I wanted it to be the least opulent it could be: it is meant to feel ‘as if it had always been there’ though being contemporary and in many ways very distant from tradition’.”

Furthermore, the architect spoke of how the simplicity is “so essential that you can almost think of it as a temporary place, as if it were an outdoor park. A light, flexible space that, as if it was there already, could now be reclaimed. a space without frills and without luxury, just like the buildings of the rural tradition where people both lived and worked.”

Relying on its relationship with the outdoors, Border Crossing House fantasises of the regionalist heritage of ‘Rustico’ but refuses to typecast itself into one of conformist creativity. Instead, Casa di ConFine defines its own style, its own form—a home of total libertà, as the locals might say.

(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
(Credit: Alessandro Magi Galluzzi)
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