How Hunter S. Thompson and John Prine helped Bill Murray fight depression
(Credit: Aaron Poole / ©A.M.P.A.S.)

Revisit Bill Murray’s perfect rant about technology: “Who thinks up all this high-tech stuff anyway?”

The enigmatic legend that currently embodies the hopes and dreams of so many, aka Bill Murray, has done a lot of great things in his time. Whether it is being a part of some of Hollywood’s biggest feature films, or indeed, his off-screen antics which are equally as wonderful—there isn’t much Murray does that we don’t love.

The latest note in this long list of reasons we love Bill Murray is a 1982 filmed rant about technology. As part of a small performance for the TV show Wired In, Murray hilariously mimics the usual anti-technology rhetoric which was rife in the eighties.

While the show would never get off the ground and failed to make it to the airwaves, it did still manage to snag Bill Murray for one of its pilots. Murray isn’t necessarily known for his tech-savviness, but it’s his personality which shines through this footage.

The actor manages to expertly portray the small-mindedness of those wishing to keep things just the way they were. “Who thinks up all this high-tech stuff anyway?” Murray demands. “They start with the digital watches. Tells you the time in numbers, the exact time to the second. 3:12 and 42 seconds. Who needs to know that stuff? I don’t!”

The full rant lasts nearly eight minutes and sees Murray do some of his best work. He manages to seamlessly weave between both scripted and improvised notes. Murray takes aim at not only digital watches but also automated factories and yet finds room to praise Star Wars’ R2-D2, as ride-a-long robot passengers are one of the only tech things that Murray does like. “You know what?” he concludes, “They’ll never do it — because it makes too much sense.”

In 1982 the technology wave was starting to gain a head of steam with every year. Still a long way off the vast amount that technology has infiltrated all our lives, the makers of Wired In were clearly all too aware of the anti-tech diatribe which was building across the country. The TV show may have never got moving quickly enough to make an impact, Murray’s perfect portrayal is still a distinction on their record.

It’s just another reminder of Bill Murray’s undying spirit. He may well be a Hollywood star but he is, and always will be, a man of the people.

Via: Open Culture

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