Alfred Hitchcock and Stanley Kubrick collide in the surreal mashup 'The Red Drum Getaway'
(Credit: Vimeo)

Alfred Hitchcock and Stanley Kubrick join forces in the surreal mashup ‘The Red Drum Getaway’

Often feeling like they exist in a dreamworld in and of themselves, the works of Alfred Hitchcock and Stanley Kubrick stand almost on a higher plane of cinematic consciousness. They inhabit a space of subconscious thought that makes their merger all the more believable in this excellent short film from Adrien Dezalay, Emmanuel Delabaere and Simon Philippe. 

Crammed into its tiny four-minute runtime is a microcosm of cinematic magic, a ‘what-if’ scenario made oddly believable through some excellent editing and imagination. The result is, in both ways, a dark nightmare from the perspective of the tormented Jack Torrance and also a paranoid fever dream from film-hopping James Stewart. 

Finding himself at the mouth of the ‘RedRum Getaway’, Stewart takes an unknowingly giant leap down the rabbit hole of Stanley Kubrick, guided by the puppeteering hand of Jack Torrance. Led through the erotic underworld of Eyes Wide Shut, he soon finds himself aboard the Discovery One before being spat back out onto Barry Lyndon’s English countryside.

It’s a psychedelic collage experienced by a freefalling Stewart, landing finally in the place of 2001’s monolith, viewed in horror and confusion by Kubrick’s cast.

This wonderful exercise in editing illustrates the illustrious legacy that both these directors leave. Although they may be long gone, their lasting ingenuity is ever-present in contemporary filmmaking. So palpable and realised, their films live almost autonomously. The idea that they might bump into each other is both strangely feasible and undeniably charming. 

Take a look at the fantastic short film right here:

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