Back in 1981, Stevie Nicks released ‘Leather and Lace’, the second single from her solo debut album Bella Donna.

The song, which Nicks had originally written for Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter’s duet album Leather and Lace before they decided against using it, prompted Nicks to recruit Eagles singer and then-boyfriend Don Henley for a very special duet of the track.

The rendition of the song, built out of emotion, came at a time when Nicks’ romantic relationship with Henley was heavily documented as the duo attempted to propel their solo careers to new heights away from their respected bands.

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After an intense songwriting session which had tensions running high, Nicks was growing increasingly frustrated at the lack of progress despite the best efforts of Henley who was attempting to match Nicks’ driving ambition. After batting around different ideas, the pair subsequently settled on a duet version of the song which would go on to be a heavily romantic single on Nicks’ record-breaking album Bella Donna.

Heading into the studio, Henley laid down his version of the song first and disappeared to work on his own solo material. Following on from that, Nicks entered the booth to lay down her vocals, delicately working her own sound alongside the track.

Below, enjoy the footage of Nicks in action:

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Bella Donna, which spent nearly three years on the Billboard 200 between 1981 and 1984, is Nicks’ best-selling album to date and has been included in the “Greatest of All Time Billboard 200 Albums” chart.

After collaborating with Henley Nicks would also include ‘Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around’, a song she worked on with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Following a short national tour in support of the album, Nicks would later release a live performance of ‘Leather And Lace’ which she used as a video promo for the single release. Interestingly though, Nicks decided to use the solo version and did not feature Don Henley.

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